Income Taxes: 30 Million May Be Hit By AMT This Year (VIDEO) | Roland Martin Reports

Income Taxes: 30 Million May Be Hit By AMT This Year (VIDEO)

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Source: ABC News / Alan Farnham

Get ready to start paying higher taxes—$3,900 to $8,000 more a year on average. Unless Congress acts, some 30 million Americans will have to pay the dreaded Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), whose rates, depending on your income, are either 26 percent or 28 percent.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, “Nearly every married taxpayer with income between $100,000 and $500,000 will owe some alternative tax.”

Like many awful things, the AMT is the result of good intentions.

It was created by Congress in the 1960s to help ensure that even the most tax-savvy rich paid some minimum amount. Congress, however, did not index its definition of “rich” to inflation. The result is that an income that qualified you as rich 30 years ago subjects you to the AMT—or would, if Congress didn’t authorize, every year, a “patch”—a specified amount of money a filer can deduct from his adjusted gross to stay below the AMT’s threshold.

If Congress failed to approve a new patch, the permissible amount for married couples filing jointly would fall, for example, from the current $74,450 to $45,000. “A lot more people would start paying a lot more money,” says Andrew Schwartz, founder of Schwartz & Schwartz, P.C., a CPA firm specializing in the tax and financial planning issues applicable to young professionals.

TO read this article in its entirety visit ABC News.