Heavy Coffee Consumption Linked To Higher Death Risk

Source: Cathy Payne / USA Today

The debate over coffee’s health risks continues to brew. A new study, out Thursday, finds that heavy coffee consumption is associated with a higher death risk in men and women younger than 55.

In the study published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, men younger than 55 who drank more than 28 cups of coffee a week (four cups a day) were 56% more likely to have died from any cause. Women in that age range had a twofold greater risk of dying than other women. The study looked at 43,727 men and women ages 20-87 from 1971 to 2002.

“From our study, it seems safe to drink one to three cups of coffee a day,” says the study’s second co-author Xuemei Sui. “Drinking more than four cups of coffee a day may endanger health,” says Sui, assistant professor of exercise science with the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. She defines a cup of coffee as 6 to 8 ounces.

The study did not find a higher death risk for adults 55 and older. Sui says there may be a bias — the research may not include unhealthy older people because they might have already died.

To read this article in its entirety visit the USA Today.

Protected with SiteGuarding.com Antivirus