Report: Voter ID Laws Reduce Turnout More Among African American And Younger Voters | Roland Martin Reports

Report: Voter ID Laws Reduce Turnout More Among African American And Younger Voters

Source: Reid Wilson / The Washington Post

Laws requiring voters to show identification when they cast a ballot impact have a greater impact on African Americans and younger voters than on other racial and age groups, according to a new analysis.

The report, issued Wednesday by the General Accounting Office [pdf], found that fewer African Americans have the types of identification — like a driver’s license or state-issued identification card — required to obtain a ballot than whites. As a consequence, turnout among African American voters fell by a larger percent than turnout among white voters in two states that implemented identification requirements between 2008 and 2012.

Black turnout dropped by 3.7 percentage points more than white turnout in Kansas, and by 1.5 percentage points more than whites in Tennessee after voter ID laws passed. Among 18 year olds, turnout dropped by 7.1 percentage points more in Kansas than it did among those aged 44 to 53 year-olds in Kansas. Turnout in Tennessee fell by 1.2 percentage points more among those aged 19 to 23 than among the older set.

The report came at the request of Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) and Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), after a Supreme Court ruling earlier this year eliminated some parts of the Voting Rights Act. The senators said the report showed both the restrictive impacts of voter identification laws and the high costs of obtaining an identification.

To read this article in its entirety visit The Washington Post.

  • Curtis Faulkner

    Southern Politics and the SEC

    by Curtis Faulkner , Sunday Sept. 14, 2014

    University of Arkansas Majorities

    As we end the height of our political ideals with the passing of the first Black President, we enter a time of lingering serious dialog on racial equality, socially and economically.

    Politically, current southern concerns involve actions said to restrict voting rights of some who have not proper identification. Despite record high voting turnout of our last two national elections, an ideal touted as a basic aspect of our nation’s republic, seems one concern that begs many questions as to why?

    National statistics say, the largest voting blocks for Black Americans has returned to the south. Would this not be considered a plus for southerners, proving the south’s value to our national political growth of the past 50 years? After all, blacks who left during that time, now return with education and financial resources. Industries and automotive companies like Nissan,Toyota and Mercedes Benz, have added to textile, technology and agriculture providing a broad range of skilled employment opportunities previously never had. All topped off by the likes NCAA sports, SEC football in particular.

    If college football championships equate with success, and the SEC’s role in that success has a value, the south has risen again and its southern influence is surely pervasive. In which case Black southerners shouldn’t be faced with such politically challenging concerns like voting or equal access to any opportunities. Moreover, the southern equal of its educational institutions are steeped in the makeup of colleges in the SEC. Of the top 20 earning NCAA football teams, 7 in the SEC (Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Auburn, Georgia and LSU) earning some $684,544.502 annually since 2008, alone. In doing so, preserving southern heritage and promoting the new winning south. Consider additionally, five of which are in the top 10 earning teams in the country with annual revenues topping $585M. Throw in what the rest of the other 9 SEC programs earn collectively ($557.7M) and you have the most profitable conference in the NCAA from years 2000 to present. Given the overwhelming number of black young men and women (85% football, basketball, track) contributing to these astounding annual billion dollar yields, and the deep spirit and social decorum of southern football in particular, it is unimaginable the SEC isn’t greatly influential in southern politics. Southern U.S. Senators have been known to lobby SEC officials for colleges wishing to enter or exit with tens of millions of dollars to be paid in doing so.

    So, you would have to believe any voting concerns that are said to restrict “Mam’aw” Jones from voting simply because of some said “proper” ID should be insulting and undermining to the brand and values of the SEC. Acceptable or proper I.D. should simply be, Dem’ is Miss Jones’ grand-babies making all dat’ money for the SEC, and you sayin’ she and dem’ kids gon’ have a hard time in casting a vote? Such wouldn’t be nowhere kin’ to southern hospitality, let lone respectful. If as southerners we are in fact, respectful of laws, support and believe in equal opportunity as our creed in restoring our future, do fully abide to the Supreme Court determination that a citizen’s voice is as strong as the money placed behind it, Black southerners and their young adults should have a lion’s roar. And, all benefactors of the earnings of the SEC should demand they be heard.

  • Curtis Faulkner

    Southern Politics and the SEC

    by Curtis Faulkner , Sunday Sept. 14, 2014

    University of Arkansas Majorities

    As we end the height of our political ideals with the passing of the first Black President, we enter a time of lingering serious dialog on racial equality, socially and economically.

    Politically, current southern concerns involve actions said to restrict voting rights of some who have not proper identification. Despite record high voting turnout of our last two national elections, an ideal touted as a basic aspect of our nation’s republic, seems one concern that begs many questions as to why?

    National statistics say, the largest voting blocks for Black Americans has returned to the south. Would this not be considered a plus for southerners, proving the south’s value to our national political growth of the past 50 years? After all, blacks who left during that time, now return with education and financial resources. Industries and automotive companies like Nissan,Toyota and Mercedes Benz, have added to textile, technology and agriculture providing a broad range of skilled employment opportunities previously never had. All topped off by the likes NCAA sports, SEC football in particular.

    If college football championships equate with success, and the SEC’s role in that success has a value, the south has risen again and its southern influence is surely pervasive. In which case Black southerners shouldn’t be faced with such politically challenging concerns like voting or equal access to any opportunities. Moreover, the southern equal of its educational institutions are steeped in the makeup of colleges in the SEC. Of the top 20 earning NCAA football teams, 7 in the SEC (Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Auburn, Georgia and LSU) earning some $684,544.502 annually since 2008, alone. In doing so, preserving southern heritage and promoting the new winning south. Consider additionally, five of which are in the top 10 earning teams in the country with annual revenues topping $585M. Throw in what the rest of the other 9 SEC programs earn collectively ($557.7M) and you have the most profitable conference in the NCAA from years 2000 to present. Given the overwhelming number of black young men and women (85% football, basketball, track) contributing to these astounding annual billion dollar yields, and the deep spirit and social decorum of southern football in particular, it is unimaginable the SEC isn’t greatly influential in southern politics. Southern U.S. Senators have been known to lobby SEC officials for colleges wishing to enter or exit with tens of millions of dollars to be paid in doing so.

    So, you would have to believe any voting concerns that are said to restrict “Mam’aw” Jones from voting simply because of some said “proper” ID should be insulting and undermining to the brand and values of the SEC. Acceptable or proper I.D. should simply be, Dem’ is Miss Jones’ grand-babies making all dat’ money for the SEC, and you sayin’ she and dem’ kids gon’ have a hard time in casting a vote? Such wouldn’t be nowhere kin’ to southern hospitality, let lone respectful. If as southerners we are in fact, respectful of laws, support and believe in equal opportunity as our creed in restoring our future, do fully abide to the Supreme Court determination that a citizen’s voice is as strong as the money placed behind it, Black southerners and their young adults should have a lion’s roar. And, all benefactors of the earnings of the SEC should demand they be heard.

  • Curtis Faulkner

    Southern Politics and the SEC

    by Curtis Faulkner , Sunday Sept. 14, 2014

    University of Arkansas Majorities

    As we end the height of our political ideals with the passing of the first Black President, we enter a time of lingering serious dialog on racial equality, socially and economically.

    Politically, current southern concerns involve actions said to restrict voting rights of some who have not proper identification. Despite record high voting turnout of our last two national elections, an ideal touted as a basic aspect of our nation’s republic, seems one concern that begs many questions as to why?

    National statistics say, the largest voting blocks for Black Americans has returned to the south. Would this not be considered a plus for southerners, proving the south’s value to our national political growth of the past 50 years? After all, blacks who left during that time, now return with education and financial resources. Industries and automotive companies like Nissan,Toyota and Mercedes Benz, have added to textile, technology and agriculture providing a broad range of skilled employment opportunities previously never had. All topped off by the likes NCAA sports, SEC football in particular.

    If college football championships equate with success, and the SEC’s role in that success has a value, the south has risen again and its southern influence is surely pervasive. In which case Black southerners shouldn’t be faced with such politically challenging concerns like voting or equal access to any opportunities. Moreover, the southern equal of its educational institutions are steeped in the makeup of colleges in the SEC. Of the top 20 earning NCAA football teams, 7 in the SEC (Alabama, Florida, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Auburn, Georgia and LSU) earning some $684,544.502 annually since 2008, alone. In doing so, preserving southern heritage and promoting the new winning south. Consider additionally, five of which are in the top 10 earning teams in the country with annual revenues topping $585M. Throw in what the rest of the other 9 SEC programs earn collectively ($557.7M) and you have the most profitable conference in the NCAA from years 2000 to present. Given the overwhelming number of black young men and women (85% football, basketball, track) contributing to these astounding annual billion dollar yields, and the deep spirit and social decorum of southern football in particular, it is unimaginable the SEC isn’t greatly influential in southern politics. Southern U.S. Senators have been known to lobby SEC officials for colleges wishing to enter or exit with tens of millions of dollars to be paid in doing so.

    So, you would have to believe any voting concerns that are said to restrict “Mam’aw” Jones from voting simply because of some said “proper” ID should be insulting and undermining to the brand and values of the SEC. Acceptable or proper I.D. should simply be, Dem’ is Miss Jones’ grand-babies making all dat’ money for the SEC, and you sayin’ she and dem’ kids gon’ have a hard time in casting a vote? Such wouldn’t be nowhere kin’ to southern hospitality, let lone respectful. If as southerners we are in fact, respectful of laws, support and believe in equal opportunity as our creed in restoring our future, do fully abide to the Supreme Court determination that a citizen’s voice is as strong as the money placed behind it, Black southerners and their young adults should have a lion’s roar. And, all benefactors of the earnings of the SEC should demand they be heard.

  • Intelligentia

    It’s both shameful and pathetic that in 2014 there are people in our community blaming the Voter ID Laws for a reason they could not vote! Why and How????? How many years now have our people known that Voter IDs are now being used as a disenfranchisement tool?

  • Intelligentia

    It’s both shameful and pathetic that in 2014 there are people in our community blaming the Voter ID Laws for a reason they could not vote! Why and How????? How many years now have our people known that Voter IDs are now being used as a disenfranchisement tool?