Roland Martin On South Carolina Teen Slammed: ‘Where Are The Black Female Organizations?’

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Roland Martin talks about the lack of support from women’s organizations in light of the South Carolina teen who was slammed to the ground by a white police officer.

“Where are the black female organizations? Where are the Linx and Ladies of Distinction? Where are the sororities? Alpha Kappa Alpha yesterday released their statement condemning what took place, calling for a federal investigation…I need black women to raise up and stand up. Young girls out there need to see somebody have their back. We also need to make sure brothers stand up for their sisters. I’m simply saying, why do we somehow stay silent and say, well, you know, she was out of line. She could be out of line and he could be wrong at the very same time,” he said.

  • Ellisa

    Black women orgs have been great supporters of the BLM movement, and are always present. This incident will not be an exception.

    brother orgs, feel to support the women and girl victims of police brutality, they way women support the men and boys. We are waiting and it would be appreciated.

  • Ellisa

    Black women orgs have been great supporters of the BLM movement, and are always present. This incident will not be an exception.

    brother orgs, feel to support the women and girl victims of police brutality, they way women support the men and boys. We are waiting and it would be appreciated.

  • Ellisa

    Black women orgs have been great supporters of the BLM movement, and are always present. This incident will not be an exception.

    brother orgs, feel to support the women and girl victims of police brutality, they way women support the men and boys. We are waiting and it would be appreciated.

    • https://www.youtube.com/user/tootinytotickle Kingteeuhh

      this right here though…my thoughts precisely.

    • Edythe Ford

      Sister that’s what I am saying. But the last time I was around the Alpha’s they were having a party and playing degrading to women gangsta rap, so so much for the men. The ones that care, they call them gay. So we getting attacked by our men and the white man.

  • Tommy Anderson

    Integration, loss of Black morals, charter and values, Black talent ten leaving the community, not understanding that white folks wanted that to happen where by they could get most of their cities down town areas (urban renewal) back to make into to major revitalized showcases (re-gentrification). Black Pastors that don’t do anything about or have any leadership about these community related issues and also don’t have the church as a physical refuge anymore on a daily basics. But the MAIN THING, We are out of the ORDER of GOD by how we run or manage our families, Mostly no fathers, small or very small amount of mothers and out of order children reign is the way of the day. But we do have a instruction manual (THE BIBLE). A Pastor friend asked the question what has made the African-American race worst and this is my answer. Where are the REST OF THE BLACK PASTORS, IF YOU STAND FOR NOTHING YOU WILL FALL FOR ANYTHING.

    • Edythe Ford

      Those dudes trying to buy a cadillac.

  • Keith Schenck

    Know Justice
    Know Peace
    #socialjusticewithoutborders

  • Stefanie Davis

    What if this young lady was pregant in 1st Trimester or may have received some bad news about a health disease or STD, lets keep it real. I have a 15 yr old daughter in school, How do we get teachers with no skills set in conflict resolution, behavior modification? Then contract with police officers to patrol the halls and frisk for weapontry or narcotics, many of these young ladies probably have a family memeber or a parent in jail or prison, perhaps she had a trauma moment, but never the less, these teachers are afraid to deal 1:1 with our kids and have stereotyped her for life.

    • Brenda L Williams

      Your absolutely right the teacher should know how to handle the situation. I’ve been in classrooms for over 20 years and have had many disruptive students black, white and never have I ever had to call a school campus safety or resources officer. I’m known as the discipline don’t tolerate any disrespectful child and they respect as an adult.Most students respect me and other staff more than the Adm or some teachers because we can identify with them and don’t treat them like we were never kids or better than them.TALK DOWN TO THE ESCALATE THE SITUATION AND THERE ARE ALOT OF ADM THAT TALK DOWN TO STUDENT AND STAFF JUST BECAUSE THEY make more I’ve seen it over the 20 years and especially in the last six years. She hit the officer she had every right too when he put his hands on her neck then turn her desk ed over throw her across the rm really. Adm is just doing what most do stick together really. I would never let a campus safety or school resource officer do what I have seen without stepping in as a school official never. My thoughts

    • Jewel No Excuses Maynard

      Yes Teachers should know how to resolve a conflict. However, Teachers are no longer respected like they used to be. Exhibited by the fact, that this young lady was asked several times to put away her cell phone and refused. Teachers have their hands tied behind their backs and are blindfolded, by the school system, the parents and the children. Most Teachers are worried about being shot, beaten or sued by the children or their parents. So yes, some of them are very terrified to have one on one interactions with students. While that officer was extremely wrong, let’s not judge Teachers as not having any conflict resolution skills. Most children today view Teachers as their peers. They have no respect, manners or reverence for Teachers.

    • Kimball F. Credle

      Perhaps you are making to many hypothetical excuses, which is probably why some many are being left behind as it is. Skills set and conflict training occur on the job everyday. To me, the problem is kids coming to school and behaving in a manner that obstructs other kids from learning and getting ahead.

      • Stefanie Davis

        Mr. Credele, If you are not actively or directly involved in any school with young folks, “shut it down” Sir. I’m speaking as a parent, someone who talks to young ladies and I have worked in the field with youth and adults in various capacities. Im not justifying the behavior wuth a rational or excuse. Classroom disruption’s occur daily in my childs room and verbal as well as physical activity, safety and wellbeing factors come into play for other faculty, students, Lets not mis-direct our comments at one another and be critcle and rule out, we are dealing with a female and since you cant think like a woman thinks that’s my job. You have a great day and perhaps you can do some justice and help the young men who have anger and aggression in schools and skip class, put your role to your annointing and be a brother’ s keeper in communication and conflict resolution to decrease violent prone tendencies, high school issues etc.

        • Kimball F. Credle

          My Dear Lady, I’m a active parent, husband of teacher, mentor of many, and very much involved in the local school system. I also serve on the local county juvenile justice panel program. So you are premature in your assessment of me. With that, I believe I’m more qualified than you to speak on this matter. For you say classroom disruptions occur daily so easily says you too are just as much at fault of the problem in our community because you see it as acceptable. I don’t! I fore one value the tax payers investments, and that includes their children getting a good education that leads to them being able to compete internationally. This might not be important to you, but it is to me. I’m about solving problems in our community, not allowing them to exist and hold kids back. It seems to me, you’re just the opposite. Now, good day to you!

          • Stefanie Davis

            Its, Ms. Davis, very well. I know my career and community experience and former corrections job so kudos to you for working in a school. I have nothing further on this subject to convey to you.

          • nycplayboy78

            YASSSSS Ms. Davis you BETTA HOLLA!!!!!

          • Leslie Kelley

            Mr. Credle, I don’t think Ms.Davis was suggesting that classroom disruptions are ‘acceptable’ at all. And you surely can’t believe that’s what she meant.
            What she was saying is that classroom disruptions are a reality that occur in schools. ALL schools, among ALL kinds and colors of students. It’s the nature of children.
            However disruptive or frustrating these disruptions are however, cannot justify brutality against a child.

          • Kimball F. Credle

            This type of behavior and action don’t occur as often in private or charter schools. Your response, like others, make it seem as this is normal and should be accepted. I do not agree. Teachers are not trained social workers, they are trained professional teachers. The time is now for us a people to stop the excuses, and hold teenagers and their parents accountable.

  • Ray Ballard

    The behavior of the student and the resource officer is indefensible. According to most news sources, an educator instructed the student to leave the classroom for cell phone violation and the student refused to comply. An administrator was contacted and the administrated instructed the student to leave the classroom and the student refused to comply. A resource officer was requested and the resource officer instructed the student to leave the classroom and the student refused to comply.

  • Jewel No Excuses Maynard

    Roland everything that has happened that led to the BLM movement we women have been there. The majority of what happened, happened to our black men and we were right their supporting or leading. Not once did we (women) cry out, where are our black male organizations? We led and supported. Why you have the need to cry out for black female organizations is beyond me. It seems like you are being a bit sexist. This young lady is a member of the African-American community. That includes men, women and children. Old, young and in-between. We should all speak out about this, not just females.

    • Sharron Hunter-Rainey

      Women have always been there, but sometimes working behind the scenes and not being recognized for their contributions. I graduated from the same HS as the two youngest children as MLK, and it was the new millennium when it finally occurred to me that although when Coretta Scott King started many statements invoking the name of her late husband, those were HER ideas. (MLK had been dead for nearly a decade when I heard her speak most often, yet it was another 25 years before I “connected the dots.”)

  • Kimball F. Credle

    In short, I interpret Mr. Martin as excusing bad behavior of many, and allowing those that mean well to be taken advantage of by those who mean you harm. I’m not saying what PO did was right, but I understand his frustration with the young lady and her lack of respect for authority.

    • Aaron Lynch

      Your comment is exactly what he’s talking about though.

      You ***ARE*** excusing the Police officer. Because he’s the adult, he’s the trained officer.

      When I was 18, every boy I knew, KNEW that if we got into a fight with a minor we’d go to jail. Because we were expected to be adults, and an adult hitting a kid was a felony in my state. Period end of story and it doesn’t really matter WHAT the kid did, we knew we’d be held responsible for it.

      If she had spat in his false and broke his nose, his behavior would STILL be unacceptable. And it would still be unacceptable that he was there at all.

      • Treasure Edwards

        Agree totally

      • Kimball F. Credle

        Not really Mr. Lynch! My focus is on the fact that officer had to be called in the first place. No one is talking about or raising the question/concern about officer’s getting called to schools everyday for this type of behavior. No one is saying nothing, which I interpret as being acceptable to many. So when an officer comes along an reacts, inappropriately yes, Mr. Martin wants everybody to jump out of their seats. The larger problem needs to be addressed, and that is the behavior of a lot these kids. If you want to address the school to prison pipeline, you’ll need to address the home first.

        • ab

          But why must it be automatically assumed that the childs behavior was so horrible that an officer had to be called. Could it POSSIBLY be that the teacher may have just overreacted? I’ve been in classrioms for years and there are teachers who just shouldn’t be teaching, or at the very least arent the best at handling the very population they’re there to teach. Also, no ones talking about the fact that she took her phone out to turn the ringer off, and the teacher happened to see her as she was putting it away. The child did apologize, said she just do her work, and begged not to go to the office, but the teacher called the VP anyway. Honestly, it could have ended right there….

          • RAZZ

            THAT IS ABSOLUTELY CORRECT! No classroom management!

          • Aaron Lynch

            YUP, I don’t really see a problem child, I see 4 or 5 missed opportunities of the school staff. Teacher passes buck to admin, admin passes buck to “officer Slam” who is only there because long ago the District Passed the buck and decided to not to empower or trust their staff to make decisions and so they failed their ONLY JOB and outsourced any difficult choice to the Sheriff’s Department. And in fact, the state legislature who decided it was a good idea to charge these kids with a crime and $1,000 bond in the first place.

          • Ramona

            Both adults over-reacted. Agreed, once this escalated the class room teacher just sat there.
            This not black or white. It it is just wrong to treat an individual (especially) in that manner.

          • Kimball F. Credle

            Teachers have engaged kids and have been injured. The school system does not compensate for injuries sustained. Policies were enacted to reduce encounters between students and teachers. This is why now they call the officers when kids don’t comply or in situations like this.

          • Kimball F. Credle

            No assumptions! It was officially noted that this is not the first incident with this 16 year old girl. Your testament is not that of the teacher. I should have ended with her just complying with the teacher, rather than being disobedient.

        • Aaron Lynch

          Don’t even get me started on this police thing. I think most places would be fine with State Police and a sheriff Dept.

          Cities over about 400k could add a local PD.

          What we have now, is a recipe for failure. Schools START by hiring a guy that couldn’t get a job with the FBI, Or the Highway Patrol, Or the Big City. So right at the beginning, most schools are recruiting from the bottom of the barrel.

          These officers should only be called if it’s a situation in which you’d call 911. In which case, why do they even exist? Why not just call 911?

          And you day talk about her lack of respect and victim blaming. I’m sorry if you don;t think you are doing that but what I see is a young girl that shut down and was incapable of reacting when three grown men started yelling at her. And the bigger point that I think you miss is that her ‘disrespect’ is irrelevant in this case. If she’d spat on him, his reaction would STILL be uncalled for.

          And lastly, how do you fix the home when her parents are dead and she’s in foster care? What we actually have control over is the school, and THE LEAST we can do is offer a sanctuary and understanding and more importantly TREAT HER with respect and understanding for a few hours a day which is what I think was lacking here.

        • Kimball F. Credle

          By many of your responses, it obvious many of you have no idea of what’s occurring in our public schools. Because of situations like this, you are now seeing charter and private schools thriving and parents insisting their kids attend. The behavior problem is real, like it or not. School administrators are now put in difficult positions because of policies that leave them vulnerable. I’ve stated before, the officer went to far, but I understand the frustration. Many of you, by your responses, think or believe there’s a simple fix when it is not. You have a 16 year old disobedient girl, disrupting and interfering with the learning of others. When you have extreme situations like this, it requires extreme measures. I fore one like having officers serve in our schools, many of the kids that attend them are out of control because of lack of control in the home. Teachers are there to teach, not serve as social workers. All the excuses only make our kids unprepared to compete internationally. Statistics confirm this! To much cuddling rather than demanding excellence and discipline.

        • Edythe Ford

          Well, the issue here is the young women is a recent orphan who lost her mom and grandmother recently and was placed in foster care. The administrator who sent the officer was probably well aware. My husband works for the state in foster care, that’s the first thing they do is establish a relationship with the school.

          She didn’t do anything violent l, she was chewing gum and looking at her cell. Maybe she felt bad and was looking at pics of her mom or grandmother? The kids call him Officer Slam!!! Her arm is in a caste, facial abrasions, injuries to her legs. Chewing gum, and refusing to give up your cell = violent vicious beatdown? I don’t think so. Time to make a call to parent and social worker. Not send a 300 lb. Goon to do your dirty work.

          As usually a young LADY in class stood up to speak up for her, she was arrested as well, although she didn’t touch anybody.

      • Mo Walker

        Broken nose…stop it. He then could have justified self defense.

  • Sharron Hunter-Rainey

    Mr. Martin, you belong to an international Greek letter organization just like I do. I was initiated in 1990 as number 181386, so that should imply my organization. I have already reached out to one person to address my concern and will continue to do so, as an individual not as a member of my sorority. For the record, my issue is the lack of classroom management skills apparent when a teacher seeks reinforcement from a uniformed officer when no crime was committed. I don’t believe this is a gender specific matter. It requires continued focus from people of all races and genders because the child victimized by former Officer Fields is an orphan.

    • Tonetta L Killens

      A young black woman faced abuse. How is that not gender focused? It is a matter of gender and race. Black women (we) fight for everyone but ourselves.

      This is why we aren’t represented anywhere but in sororities. In statistics and research we are grouped with blacks or women in general. We quickly find common ground with groups who minimize our presence while using our strength. We allow it.

      • Sharron Hunter-Rainey

        What I said was gender-specific. My point is that Roland Martin is biased in calling for black women’s groups to speak out on this issue. You and I are in agreement that this issue is at the intersection of gender AND race. Because the child in the Spring Valley HS situation is an orphan, men and women of every race need to collaborate to give voice to this unacceptable situation. I’m in a sorority, but I’m not waiting on my organization to speak up, I’ve used my voice as an individual.

        • Mo Walker

          Every race? Wait on it…

          • Sharron Hunter-Rainey

            You might be surprised. If you had told me last year the flag of defiance was coming down in 2015, I would have laughed and never believed you. (I must admit that the same weekend the SC legislature voted to take it down, my husband and I passed a man selling sweet potatoes at a roadside stand adorned with the stars and bars.)

  • Edythe Ford

    Mr. Martin there was a Black man, the teacher, standing in that classroom and didn’t do a damn thing but watch and teach the other Black male students to allow their Queens to be abused. If your must go there then why don’t Black men stand up for Black Queens? You guys won’t stop Black men from becoming rich degrading and demeaning Black women worldwide via gangsta rap. No mass movement, no Black male national organizations or fraternities.

    Black women have always stood up for our community, family and men, but you all sell us out everytime, now we baby mama’s, THOTS, b!#ches, and h@es. Everything is not one sided, I know that, but don’t you thing we do enough??

    Disappointed, heartbroken, and sad.

    • Renee

      I totally agree with Edythe Ford, why is the women fought. Our black men have and is failing us everyday. We are Queens, but they forget to put us on the throne with them.

      • Mo Walker

        Noones on the throne! Were all knee deep in sh##!

    • Sharron Hunter-Rainey

      Edythe, I generally agree with you, with a subtle distinction. The black, male teacher, Mr. Long, called for the school resource officer after he failed to maintain control of his classroom. Even though no crime had been committed, once that officer started to assault that child in his classroom, the teacher continued to do nothing. I am a teacher and a mother, I would NOT allow anyone I invited into my classroom to assault one of my students without intervention on my part. I’m not finished with my attempts to bring attention to Mr. Long’s inaction, because parents (by birth, adoption, or the foster care system) don’t send their children to school to be assaulted by those who should be responsible for their safety.

      • Jerome Pittman

        Very well said Teacher.

    • anonymous

      I am in total agreement with Roland Martin and you regarding the lack of strong, positive leadership displayed by members of our Black sororities and fraternities when it comes to speaking out and doing something regarding significant issues of importance such as “racism”. I too, have never been more disappointed and sadden by the fact that, being as knowledgeable and resourceful as most of us are, we fail to realize the trickling effect of our behaviors, be they positive or negative, on our children and other nationalities. Black women being “degraded” and” sold out” by our Black men and others continues to be unacceptable!! If we do not support and respect each other, then what do we expect of others?

  • Stefanie Davis

    A comment and/or statement was “Teachers are not social worker’s” Factual indeed, When we come into these profesiipnal of education and receive our bachelors, masters and teaching certification at what point in that career do we not get training on fostering healthy not adversarial relationships with the youth of today, while I read different responses of “finger pointing” at the youngster, I stand firm that Teacher’s have a tendency to be fed up with disciplining teens during classroom instructional time, in many cases it’s before class can even begin. Teacher’s and professional development trainings on violence at schools should be occuring on a local level as well as a national level, one gentleman stated that he sits on some juvenile detention board and contributes in some way? Teachers loose their patience when covering a class alone without support of a second pair of eyes, communities are encouraging mentorship and restorative justice initiatives to combact, violence, aggression and conflict, each school has a protacall and policy for the aledge violation, the question then becomes what was the violation infraction of school conduct? Im concentrating on the call to action, the Author Mr. Roland wants women’s groups to rally on this cause. Okay in her community or at the expense of her safety? Now moving on to speak on charter school from the same person who spoke on teachers not social worker’s, I am a charter school parent, the school is in it’s 4 year, due to significant occurences and severity of violence weather it’s documented or undocumented nased on federal dollars, they now havea SRO, certain folks like to talk on social-media, but dont produce no data or statistics! Im not a private school parent so I can’t go there, But I will say this, my charter school was/is perdominitely white from administration to teaching faculty and most girls are african-american, there is and will always be a stereotyped scenaro of the black student not follwoing the school conduct of behavior and primarily you have hired a faculty with very minimal exposure to impoverished communities of color, intrenched poverty and minimal parental educational involvement etc. I do know some teacher’s mean well, But reality is they damn tired of our youth. Now I want to clarify that I beleive the outcome was detrimental and it was healthy that the trauma can now be desensitized in that classroom, butvtge images of what we saw can’t. The call to action for women and men’s is good vesselship. So I stand as an annointing woman of faith in Rochester NY.

  • Stefanie Davis

    A comment and/or statement was “Teachers are not social worker’s” Factual indeed, When we come into these profesiipnal of education and receive our bachelors, masters and teaching certification at what point in that career do we not get training on fostering healthy not adversarial relationships with the youth of today, while I read different responses of “finger pointing” at the youngster, I stand firm that Teacher’s have a tendency to be fed up with disciplining teens during classroom instructional time, in many cases it’s before class can even begin. Teacher’s and professional development trainings on violence at schools should be occuring on a local level as well as a national level, one gentleman stated that he sits on some juvenile detention board and contributes in some way? Teachers loose their patience when covering a class alone without support of a second pair of eyes, communities are encouraging mentorship and restorative justice initiatives to combact, violence, aggression and conflict, each school has a protacall and policy for the aledge violation, the question then becomes what was the violation infraction of school conduct? Im concentrating on the call to action, the Author Mr. Roland wants women’s groups to rally on this cause. Okay in her community or at the expense of her safety? Now moving on to speak on charter school from the same person who spoke on teachers not social worker’s, I am a charter school parent, the school is in it’s 4 year, due to significant occurences and severity of violence weather it’s documented or undocumented nased on federal dollars, they now havea SRO, certain folks like to talk on social-media, but dont produce no data or statistics! Im not a private school parent so I can’t go there, But I will say this, my charter school was/is perdominitely white from administration to teaching faculty and most girls are african-american, there is and will always be a stereotyped scenaro of the black student not follwoing the school conduct of behavior and primarily you have hired a faculty with very minimal exposure to impoverished communities of color, intrenched poverty and minimal parental educational involvement etc. I do know some teacher’s mean well, But reality is they damn tired of our youth. Now I want to clarify that I beleive the outcome was detrimental and it was healthy that the trauma can now be desensitized in that classroom, butvtge images of what we saw can’t. The call to action for women and men’s is good vesselship. So I stand as an annointing woman of faith in Rochester NY.

    • Edythe Ford

      But he did not call men to action, as usual that call was for Black women. Again, when is someone gonna rescue us? I am very strong in my faith, that’s not biblical at all, we are a man’s help meet, yet we do all the hiding, protesting, aND degradation.

      I bet lunch no large national org will speak up, fraternities or sororities. Heck, a woman with a white man, alone, took down the confederate flag this summer. Who was there to protect her, no one.

      • Stefanie Davis

        Ms. Ford, Im not in disagreement with you, frankly it takes a “villiage”. I can only speak for myself on social media, Im not affiliated with a sorority in my city, But I have not seen anyone publically do a media release, On saying that, this case is in the preliminary stage of external investigations as I myself see on the News. So I do agree with you, that we need women’s groups and supporter’s to address matters as these. As far as the confederate flag case, I dont have a comment and not every cause I get my mind on, I have my own litigation disputes to be pro bono on. You have a great evening.

        • ANS

          @stefanie_davis:disqus- Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. did release a statement as Mr. Martin noted in his article. http://bit.ly/1Mhs4n6

        • ANS

          @stefanie_davis:disqus- Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. did release a statement as Mr. Martin noted in his article. http://bit.ly/1Mhs4n6

    • Tisha Bosha Sankey

      I feel like a baby sitter. Put away your cell phones, please be quiet I am trying to lecture. I am asking you again to put your phones away. Jane doe, stop cussing. QUIET! !!!!!!!, I am trying to lecture. Etc

  • kcsaphire

    My issue with this incident,…since when did a defiant NON VIOLENT child’s behavior get criminalized??. Children have been difiant for ages?? This kid was not responding at all .. she said nothing.. did anyone ever thing something may be going on with her. The officer used extreme violence to dedal with a Non-violent situation. An some how folks think it was appropriate. The teacher and the administrator should have been able to handle this …. no ned to call cops… she was not threatening anyone. not need to put hand on her. There are people in jail today for puttng hands on a kid in that manner.

    • Tisha Bosha Sankey

      If you were a teacher you would understand. I am not condoning his behavior, he left his frustration get the best of him. I feel as if I am in a war zone sometimes

      • Malik

        I understand you being a teacher but one question do think this officer would do this to a white female child ?

        • blkgw/w

          He might have, but no one in the class would have let him…

      • Jerome Pittman

        Then quit and find a job that is not a war zone. I can’t see how anybody could understand, teacher or not. You are mixing up corrective response with punitive responses. I guess teacher and cops feel that punitive responses are acceptable if a student does not follow directions.

  • Frances

    You are absolutely right Roland Martin, where are the Black Women Organizations? I want to take it a step further, where are the Black Leaders Period! Not just for this issue, but all issues that are impacting our community, our nations. Where are the real Black leaders in our communities? #drfrancesrichards

  • enochmubarak

    SAVE IT..Roland Martin nor the world for that matter would know a thing about the incident had not the black woman revealed it because not only did the black man call the police but stood by and watched the sister get man handled and anytime the white man look at something and decide it is even to brutal for his nature that the guy was fired then only cowardliness can be the excuse for a black man to stand up close and personal to the situation and do nothing while we claim to be the humanity of the world..so where was the black man because the black woman was on point.

  • enochmubarak

    SAVE IT..Roland Martin nor the world for that matter would know a thing about the incident had not the black woman revealed it because not only did the black man call the police but stood by and watched the sister get man handled and anytime the white man look at something and decide it is even to brutal for his nature that the guy was fired then only cowardliness can be the excuse for a black man to stand up close and personal to the situation and do nothing while we claim to be the humanity of the world..so where was the black man because the black woman was on point.

  • Nora Shirden

    Roland you need to be asking about the administration, the issue that they have police officers who handle criminals on the street in schools. All questions should be directed to the school. Pare ts send their children to school to be educated not tone manhandle. I don’t care if the child was wrong she wasn’t to be treated that way. If she had of come to school all beat up with a head injury where would that parent be they would be charged with child abuse I feel the school should be charge with abuse to a minor the law is the law you don’t change it to suit officials.

  • Shiznaw

    “Where are the Black Females?”
    Answer: They’re too busy twerking as back-up dancers for Miley Cyrus.

  • BOOBMAN

    150 white men with guns take over a fed building and no one is shot,,poor tamir rice

  • BOOBMAN

    150 white men with guns take over a fed building and no one is shot,,poor tamir rice

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